Honey Cake

Honey Cake

A Recipe from The Golden Jubilee Recipe Book (1959)

About the Recipe

Tonight (September 6, 2021) at sundown, is the start of Rosh Hashana, the Jewish holiday celebrating the new year. It’s one of my favorite holidays. It means time with family, getting a little bit of wine even when it wasn’t supposed to be allowed, and of course – delicious food. One of the traditional dishes to celebrate is honey cake, so of course I went looking for a good one!

This one is delicious! Light and fluffy, and just the right amount of sticky sweet for a sweet new year. It’s already bubbling and rising by the time the batter goes into the pan, which is exactly what one looks for in a great honey cake. It’s got a very traditional flavor to it, without all the density that sometimes comes along.

Two quick changes – throw this one in a 9×13 pan. Otherwise you’ll end up with batter everywhere! And I went a little bit lighter on the added sugar, maybe a 1/4 cup less. I find the balance is a bit better.

L’shana tovah! And happy 5782!

About the book

This book is the gift that keeps on giving. As it turns out, this little B’nai B’rith book has filtered down all over the New York metro area. A friend of mine found the noodle kugel recipe that I shared previously and noted that it was the same one she used in childhood. The dishes in it seem to be all of the regional favorites of Jewish New York, and I’m not even a little bit upset about it.

On a more personal note, one of the ladies who submitted a “Similar recipe” above is Rose Dubinsky. My paternal grandmother was a Dubinsky. Her family came over through Ellis Island and lived in New York for awhile before relocating to the Baltimore/DC area. I can’t help but wonder if an old family recipe has just come back around to find me this time around…

The Recipe!

Ingredients:

4 eggs
2 cups sugar
1 lb. honey
1 t baking soda
1 cup strong coffee
4 cups flour
2 t baking powder
Juice of 1/2 lemon
Juice of 1/2 orange
1/4 cup almonds

Directions:

Mix eggs and sugar together; add honey.

Dissolve soda with a little hot water and add.

Sift flour and baking powder; add alternately with coffee; add the juices; stir in almonds.

Line 8″ x 10″ (I used a 9×13 and barely had enough room) baking dish with foil; pour in batter and bake in 350*F oven one hour.

Blueberry Buckle

Blueberry Buckle

A Recipe from the Mary Margaret McBride Encyclopedia of Cooking (1959)

About the Recipe

When a friend invited me over for dinner at the tail end of berry season, and with a fridge full of blueberries, I happily volunteered – “I’ve got dessert!” This quick and easy little cake was the perfect cap to a dinner with friends. Any berry could be easily substituted for the blueberries, and you could even go full on triple berry if you’re feeling saucy. Any way it’s done, this is a great last-minute-I’ve-got-the-dessert recipe.

While we’re here though – you might be asking yourself, what is a “buckle?” Simply put, a buckle is much like a coffee cake. It’s traditionally got fruit in the batter and a crumb topping, with a fairly high batter to fruit ratio. It’s called a buckle because the weight of the crumb makes the cake do just that when it comes out of the oven – buckle!

About the Book

Part of my weekly routine since I started collecting cookbooks is to sit down with a small stack of them as I’m making my grocery list, and picking out one or two to try over the course of the week. While that’s fantastic for finding new things to try for dinner, it’s not great when I’m seeking something specific (like, say, blueberry desserts). For the specific ask, there’s only one resource I turn to – the Mary Margaret McBride. I’ll spare more waxing poetic about this amazing book for now, but suffice it to say that if you’re looking for a gift for someone new to the kitchen this is the perfect fit.

Check out more recipes in the Mary Margaret McBride Collection here!

About the Glassware

The baking dish is a new acquisition of mine from a road trip I took with my husband earlier this year. It’s a Fire King by Anchor Hocking with a Primrose pattern. This pattern was produced in the early ’60’s and when I saw it, I had to add it to the collection. I rarely see this pattern in my usual antique/vintage haunts and it’s just so cute. It felt like the perfect mid-century dish for this mid-century dish.

The Recipe!

Ingredients:

Crumb Topping:
1/2 cup sugar
1/3 cup sifted enriched flour
1/2 t cinnamon
3 T soft butter or margarine

Batter:
1/4 cup soft butter or margarine
3/4 cup sugar
1 egg
1/2 cup milk
1 1/2 cups sifted enriched flour
2 t baking powder
1/2 t salt
1 14-oz can blueberries, drained OR 1 pint fresh blueberries

Directions:

Crumb Topping:
Measure sugar, flour, and cinnamon into small bowl. Mix well.

Add butter or margarine and cut in with fork or pastry blender until mixture is consistency of crumbs

Batter:
Stir butter or margarine until creamy. Add sugar, gradually, mixing until creamy. Beat in egg. Add milk.

Sift together flour, baking powder, and salt. Stir into butter or margarine mixture, stirring until smooth. Gently fold in blueberries.

Spread batter into well buttered pan, 8×8 inches.

Sprinkle with crumb topping. Bake in moderate oven (375*F.) 45-50 minutes.

Perfect Potato Salad

Perfect Potato Salad

A Recipe from Better Homes & Gardens Salad Book (1958)

About the Recipe

When friends are coming over for a beach picnic, what do you do? You make potato salad, of course! I went to this book right away looking for a recipe, knowing that it was one of my grandma’s go-to’s. When I saw the 3x math on the page, I knew this one had to be a winner!

My husband doesn’t like celery, so I left it out. The onions and pickles give it plenty of crunch and flavor, and in the end it’s exactly as described – a perfect potato salad.

For potato salad newbies (like me!), don’t miss the step by step instructions on how to cook the perfect potato for a salad.

About the Glassware

I found the cradle and the Fire King rectangular baking dish together at a vintage store just outside of Palm Springs on a recent visit. It’s not clear on whether they might have been originally purchased together or not. Many sets like this seem to have a clear dish instead of an opaque one. Either way, it’s a great little serving piece, and I can’t resist the opportunity to make potato salad look fancy.

About the Book

I went to visit my grandma this past weekend, who is getting ready to move out of the house that she’s lived in for… well a very long time. It’s no secret to anyone following my posts that she’s a big inspiration for a lot of the work I do on this blog. While I was there, she told me to take the cookbooks. Any of them that I wanted, including this Salad Book. I cried.

This book is so clearly well loved and well used. There’s a page covered in plastic wrap, because a recipe was used so often, she was trying to keep the splatter off it (a Caesar salad, for the record!). There are splotches on most, if not all of the pages. The edges are torn. I could not love this book more.

The Recipe!

Ingredients:

2 1/2 cups cubed or sliced cooked potatoes
1 t sugar
1 t vinegar
1/2 cup chopped onion
1/2 cup sliced celery (if desired)
1/4 cup sliced sweet pickle (if desired)
1 1/2 t salt
1 1/2 t celery seed
3/4 c mayonnaise
2 hard-cooked eggs, sliced

Directions:

Sprinkle potatoes with sugar and vinegar. Add onion, celery, pickle, seasonings, and mayonnaise; toss to blend. Carefully “fold in” egg slices. Chill. Serve in lettuce-lined bowl. Trim with egg slices.

Cook potatoes in boiling salted water, peel and cube — they’re salad-ready

1. Scrub potatoes thoroughly with a firm vegetable brush. Choose potatoes of equal size so all will get done at the same time.

2. Cook potatoes in boiling, salted water. Begin fork testing after 25 minutes of cooking. When just tender, remove from heat and drain. Shake in pan over low heat to dry.

3. Peel potatoes while hot, holding on long fork or on paper towel. Salad secret: Mix salad with warm potatoes — they absorb seasonings.

4. Halve potatoes lengthwise. With flat side down on cutting board, slice each potato half in 3/4-inch strips. Then cut it crosswise to make bite-size cubes.

Blueberry Pancakes #2

Blueberry Pancakes #2

A Recipe from the Mary Margaret McBride Encyclopedia of Cooking (1959)

About the Recipe

I woke up yesterday with an undeniable craving for blueberry pancakes. After a quick search through the MMMB, I came across this particular recipe. I took a look around for Blueberry Pancakes #1 – and did not find it. SO! Blueberry Pancakes #2, a delightfully over-complicated pancakes recipe it is!

Separating the eggs and beating up the whites plus the slightly high amount of baking powder makes for a wonderfully fluffy pancakes. They were well balanced between sweet, savory, and fruit. I would even make them again with different fruit or sans fruit altogether! Try a little lemon rind for a special twist if you’d like, but otherwise enjoy. And know that the extra 10 minutes or so to make them are definitely going to be worth it. Bonus points to the hubby this time around for helping to fold the egg whites!

I got to pull out my favorite Pyrex Frankenset and enlist the help of the hubby to fold in the egg whites. A wonderful way to kick-off brunch, indeed!

About the Book

I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again – I love this cookbook. Not only is it a fantastic resource for any home cook looking for literally any recipe, but the illustrations and photographs are everything you’d look for in a mid-century cookbook. They look both appetizing and disgusting, all at once!

Check out more recipes in the Mary Margaret McBride Collection here!

The Recipe!

Ingredients:

1 1/2 cups sifted enriched flour
2 1/2 t baking powder
3 T granulated sugar
3/4 t salt
2 eggs, separated
1 cup milk
3 T melted shortening
1 cup blueberries
Melted butter
Brown sugar

Directions:

Sift dry ingredients together. Beat egg yolks with rotary beater; combine with milk and shortening.

Add to dry ingredients and mix until smooth. Stir in blueberries. Then fold in stiffly beaten egg whites.

Bake on hot, greased griddle. Serve with melted butter, and sprinkle with brown sugar. Makes 12 3-inch pancakes.

Blueberry Peach Pie

Blueberry Peach Pie

A Recipe from Betty Crocker’s Outdoor Cook Book (1961)

About the Recipe

Nothing quite says summer like a fresh fruit pie. This is a delightfully simple pie recipe, designed for making quickly and toting to a picnic or barbecue. Peach and blueberry is a classic combination, and this pie just works.

I used pre-made Pillsbury pie crusts (because some days there’s just not time to make it from scratch, and that’s okay), but feel free to use your favorite 9-inch crust, anything will do. Two quick adjustments – I doubled the butter, using about 3 tablespoons dotted across the pie. Next time I’ll also toss the blueberries in a little bit of lemon juice. This pie is a little bit on the sweet side, and that little bit of acidity would go a long way.

Don’t make my mistake – let it cool and set before serving to avoid some of the soupy mess you see above. And trust me when I say this is worth the wait. It tasted even better when I had it for breakfast this morning.

Otherwise, I’m pleased to report that my friend Raab (dressed in his ’50’s bowling shirt and toting his adorable daughter, Lila) enjoyed it quite heartily as dessert to our first barbecue of the season.

About the Book

This book is everything you’d look for in a mid-century style cookbook – a little bit absurd, great illustrations, and a little bit of racism (buyer beware…). It came my way via the sister of a good friend of mine who heard through the grapevine that I was also a collector.

It almost seems a shame to start with a pie, as the heart of this cookbook is in all of the great outdoor recipes found within – clambakes, broiled steaks, banana boats. But don’t fret – there will be more coming from this classic as the summer gets on.

The Recipe!

Ingredients:

Pastry for 9″ Two-crust Pie
1 to 1 1/2 cups sugar*
1/3 cup flour
1/2 t cinnamon
2 cups fresh blueberries
2 1/2 cups pared and sliced fresh peaches
1 1/2 T butter

*Use maximum amount of sugar only if berries and peaches are quite tart

Directions:

Heat oven to 425*F (hot). Stir sugar, flour, and cinnamon in small bowl. Pour blueberries in bottom of pastry-lined 9″ pie pan. Sprinkle half of the sugar-flour mixture evenly over berries. Arrange peach slices over berries. Sprinkle with remaining sugar-flour mixture. Dot with butter. Cover with top crust which has slits cut in it for steam to escape. Seal and flute. Bake 40-50 min. Cool and serve.

If using frozen fruit: Use 1 pkg. (16 oz.) frozen blueberries and two pkg. (12 oz. each) frozen peaches, thawed and drained well, saving juice. Mix 1/2 cup sugar, 1/3 cup flour, and 1/2 t cinnamon with 1/2 cup peach juice; cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until mixture thickens and boils. Boil 1 min. Add blueberries and mix lightly. Pour into pastry-lined pie pan; dot with butter; arrange peaches over blueberries and cover with top crust.

Chicken Legs, Pierre

Chicken Legs, Pierre

A Recipe from The Family Circle Fish and Poultry Cookbook (1955)

About the Recipe

There are a few things in this recipe that I find interesting enough to try again and to play with in the future. Because the chicken gets browned in the pan first, when the tomatoes (from the can! Don’t use fresh, the juice is important!) get poured into the hot pan, the effect is to de-glaze all of the goodness from the browned chicken. Basically you end up starting your sauce with a warm, flavorful base.

Once the chicken is added back into the pan and covered, effectively you’ve browned the chicken to keep it moist and then poached it for the rest of the cooking time. The result is fall-off-the-bone tender chicken legs in a nicely blended, slightly spicy sauce. On that note – add some more hot pepper sauce, you won’t regret it!

This is an easy to execute, delicious chicken recipe. While it’s on the stove poaching, use that time to whip up some mashed potatoes, which will soak up that additional pan sauce with the chicken. Yum!

About the Book

This is my first Family Circle cookbook, and what a fantastic little resource! Right from the start, the book kicks off with fantastic mid-century illustrations on how to carve poultry. The book itself is divided into sections based on what kind of bird or fish you’re planning on cooking. Do you have some duck? There’s a section for that! Some oysters? There’s a section for that, too! Grouper? Oh yes, a section for that as well.

I can see this becoming a regular for mundane and interesting recipes a lot in the future. In addition to the usual suspects (chicken a la king, poached salmon, etc.) there are some weird ones that make mid-century cooking so much fun (see: turkey pancakes). My brother Jon (in the photos below) gives this book a big thumbs up!

The Recipe!

Ingredients:

8 chicken legs
1/4 cup flour, seasoned with salt & pepper
3 T butter or margarine
1 can (about 1 lb.) tomatoes
1/2 cup water
2 T brown sugar
2 T vinegar
2 T Worcestershire sauce
1 t salt
1 t chili powder
1 t dry mustard
1/2 t celery seeds
1 clove of garlic, minced
Few drops bottled hot-pepper sauce

Directions:

1. Dust chicken legs with seasoned flour.

2. Melt butter or margarine in large heavy frying pan with tight-fitting cover; brown chicken over medium heat on all sides; drain on absorbent paper.

3. Combine remaining ingredients in same pan.

4. Bring to boiling; reduce heat; return chicken to pan; cover.

5. Simmer chicken 40-45 minutes, or until tender when pierced with 2-tine fork.

6. Serve with pan sauce.

Tuna-Cheesettes

Tuna-Cheesettes

A Recipe from preparing foods with Reynolds Wrap pure aluminum foil (195?)

About the Recipe

Imagine a tuna-melt. Now imagine that the tuna salad part has a few more ingredients than it really should. Now imagine that instead of quickly grilling it up, you’ve got to put it on a bun, wrap it in tinfoil, and bake it for a half hour. Voila! The Tuna-Cheesette is born!

This has all of the trappings of a classic post-war recipe – canned ingredients, using a war material for something other than artillery, a vaguely brown and smushy end product that tastes great, but just will not photograph well, no matter how hard you try. It’s worth the effort, though watch the salt levels. Both the husband and the brother commented on how salty the end result was (though it heartily got the husband seal of approval).

Aside from that – enjoy! These are great make-ahead sandwiches, and I could even see them working really well for sticking on charcoal for a camping trip or barbeque.

About the Book

I was so excited to get this booklet along with some of the Culinary Arts and Pillsbury booklets. It’s got great illustrations, and is so illustrative of that particular brand of re-marketing that was happening after the war. The advertising company that decided this booklet was a good idea took great pains to go through literally every use you can possibly imagine for aluminum foil.

The Recipe!

Ingredients:

1/4 lb. processed American cheese, cubed
3 hard cooked egg yolks, chopped
1 7-ounce can tuna, flaked
2 T chopped green pepper
2 T minced onion
2 T chopped sweet pickle
1/2 cup salad dressing
2 T chopped stuffed olives
1/2 t salt
1/8 t pepper
6 hamburger or other thick buns

Directions:

Combine ingredients except buns, mixing lightly. Split buns, spread with softened butter or margarine and fill. Wrap buns in Reynolds Wrap. Place on shallow pan and bake in slow oven (325*F) 35 minutes, until filling is heated and cheese melts. Serve hot.

Aloha Banana Bread

Aloha Banana Bread

A Recipe from Pillsbury’s BEST 12th Grand National Bake-Off Cookbook (1961)

About the Recipe

Okay, I know what you’re thinking – really, Andi? Another banana bread recipe? Hear me out though – this one is different.

I’ve written before about the wonder that surrounded the act of Hawaii finally becoming a US state. In 1961, fresh into statehood, the continental US was going crazy over everything “Hawaiian” flavored. I would say that this contestant benefited from that mania, but really this is just an excellent recipe.

The depth of flavor added by incorporating the almond, orange, and coconut to the banana bread is out of this world. It’s just enough flavor to let you know that this loaf is something different altogether. I may never make “normal” banana bread again.

For more recipes in the Pillsbury Challenge, click here!

About the book

As always with Pillsbury, there were so many great recipes in this book to choose from. This one incorporates the small black and white photos that you see on the page above near a bunch of the recipes. It’s a nice change up from the participant photos from years prior.

About the glassware

We’ve seen this pan before, so I’ll write a little bit about the company that made it – Anchor Hocking. Named after the Hocking River in Ohio and founded in 1905 as the Hocking Glass Company, Anchor Hocking is still a major producer of glassware today. The pan above is a Fire-King branded pan, produced exclusively by Anchor Hocking (much like the Corning Glass Company produces Pyrex).

Anchor Hocking is perhaps best known for its depression glass. Just before the depression as the Hocking Glass Company, they developed a machine that was able to press glass at a much higher rate than anything hand blown. When the stock market crashed, they further developed a mold that allowed them to press quickly and efficiently, selling the glasses for two for a nickel – a bargain!

For more information on Anchor Hocking, check out the museum, lovingly put together by another collector trying to preserve the history.

The Recipe!

Ingredients:

2 cups sifted flour
1 t soda
1/2 t salt
1/2 cup butter
1 cup sugar
2 unbeaten eggs
1 cup mashed very ripe bananas (2 medium)
1 T grated orange rind
1/4 cup milk
1 t vanilla
1/2 t almond extract
1 cup coconut
1/2 cup nuts, chopped

Directions:

Sift together flour, baking soda, and salt. Cream butter. Gradually add sugar, creaming well. Add eggs, bananas, and orange rind; blend thoroughly.

Combine milk, vanilla, and almond extract. Add the dry ingredients alternately with the milk mixture, beginning and ending with dry ingredients. Blend thoroughly after each edition. (With electric mixer use a low speed.) Stir in coconut and nuts.

Turn into 9x5x3-inch pan, well greased on the bottom. Bake at 350* for 60-70 minutes. Cool thoroughly before slicing.

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Yorkshire Burger

Yorkshire Burger

A Recipe from 9th Grand National Cook Book (1958)

About the Recipe

It’s been a long time since I’ve had a real Yorkshire pudding. When I saw this recipe for the first time, it didn’t actually occur to me that this would be the closest that I’d ever get to making one myself! The texture of the breading around the meatballs is like a British pudding – eggy, buttery, slightly salty. It’s absolutely delightful.

When I put it out on the table, my husband took a giant piece, grabbing 4 meatballs in one go – exactly like the picture above! Mr. Kellogg notes that his high school baseball teammates like to dig into this dish, and after seeing the excitement in my husband’s eyes when it landed on the table, I don’t doubt that they did!

One quick adaption here – we don’t eat ground beef in my house, so I substituted ground turkey. It worked really well, and I would imagine any ground meat would do fine. It was even noted at the table that some salmon or other fish based balls would also be delicious in the eggy pudding.

For more recipes in the Pillsbury Challenge, click here!

About the book

In 1958, the Bake-Off moves across the country from New York to Pennsylvania. If the photos in the book are any indication, it seems the participants had a wonderful time. Indeed, the publishers of this years book seemed to have too much fun to cram into one little volume. The front cover has the customary letter from Ann Pillsbury, and is surrounded by smaller photos of the event itself. With the 10th Anniversary to follow, they dedicate more space than usual (4 whole pages!) to the following year’s event. So exciting!

About the glassware

I just got this beautiful Butterfly Gold lasagna pan a few weeks ago (the day after I made lasagna, of course). It came from the little antiques store that I love in New Paltz, NY. I’d had my eye out for a pan like this one, and I was so excited to see it. While it’s a little shallow for casseroles (other than lasagna) in general, it’s perfect for dishes like the Yorkshire burger, and will be exactly right for bar cookies and the like.

The gravy dish was a birthday present from my husband. Spring Blossom is my favorite, and I honestly just love every excuse to bring it out of hiding.

The Recipe!

Ingredients:

1 1/2 lbs. ground beef
1/4 cup chili sauce
1 package dry onion soup
2 T chopped parsley
1/4 t pepper
1/4 t poultry seasoning
5 egg
1 T water
1 1/2 cups sifted flour
1 1/2 t double-acting baking powder
1 t salt
1 1/2 cups milk
3 T melted butter

Beef Gravy:
1/4 cup Crisco or butter
3 T flour
1 T beef extract
2 1/2 cups milk

Directions:

Combine in a mixing bowl the ground beef, chili sauce, dry onion soup, parsley, pepper, and poultry seasoning. Blend 1 of the eggs and the water. Add to meat mixture; mix well. Form into 24 small meat balls. Place in well greased 12×8-inch baking dish.

Sift together flour, baking powder, and salt. Beat 4 eggs until foamy. Add milk and melted butter; mix well. Add dry ingredients all at once to egg mixture. Beat with rotary beater (or low speed on mixer) only until smooth and well blended.

Pour over meat balls.

Bake in moderate oven (350*F) 50-60 minutes until golden brown. Serve hot with Gravy.

Beef Gravy:
Melt butter or Crisco in saucepan. Blend in flour and beef extract. Add milk. Cook, stirring occasionally, until gravy is smooth and thickened.

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Maraschino Date-Nut Cake

Maraschino Date-Nut Cake

A Recipe from Cakes & Tortes (1957)

About the Recipe

Yesterday was my little brother’s birthday, and I asked him what kind of cake he wanted. I passed him a few of my baking books and let him figure out which sounded the most interesting to give a test run. This was the cake that he picked out. He was excited about the dates, nuts, and cherries, and it was his birthday so I said “okay!” When all is said and done, I have to say that he definitely chose wisely!

All in all, this cake is wonderfully moist, yet crumbly, with just enough chocolate and spice to give it depth – a real winner! The method is a little bit more on the complicated side, but that’s to be expected with some of these Culinary Institute recipes. Note that it cooks low and slow. I actually needed to tack on another 15 minutes or so to the bake time before my tester came out clean from the center. But honestly, it was well worth the wait.

An additional note from my brother: “It goes really well with jam!”

About the Book

This is another booklet from the Culinary Arts Institute, which I’ve said before and I’ll say again are lovely little books. As with most of the others, it’s arranged into sections, this time by type of cake – butter, chiffon, angel, etc. What I didn’t realize when I bought it is that it’s really a nice basic resource on the science of cakes and tortes. Not only does it come with the 193 recipes noted on the cover, but also pages and pages of tips and tricks on how to improve your cake baking. I almost missed acquiring it from a fellow cookbook enthusiast, but last minute she found another copy and it feels like it just came home.

The Recipe!

Ingredients:

2 1/4 cups sifted flour
2 t baking powder
1 t allspice
1 t cinnamon
1/4 t salt
1 1/2 cups (about 12 oz.) maraschino cherries
2 cups pecans, chopped
1 cup date pieces
2 oz. chocolate
3/4 cup butter or margarine (softened)
1/2 t vanilla extract
2 cups sugar
4 egg yolks, well beaten
1 cup unseasoned mashed potatoes
1/2 cup milk
4 egg whites

Directions:

Prepare a 13x9x2″ pan – Grease the bottom of the pan only; line with waxed paper cut to fit bottom; grease the waxed paper.

Soft together 2 cups of the flour, baking powder, allspice, cinnamon, and salt. Set aside.

Drain, slice and set aside on absorbent paper the maraschino cherries. A few pats with the paper will absorb excess moisture.

Coarsely chop pecans. Cut dates into small pieces. Put fruits and nuts into a large bowl with remaining 1/4 cup flour. Mix well and set aside. Grate chocolate and set aside.

Cream together butter/margarine and vanilla extract until softened. Add sugar gradually, creaming until fluffy after each addition. Add the egg yolks in thirds, beating thoroughly after each addition. Add the chocolate and mashed potatoes and beat until well blended.

Measure out the milk. Beating only until blended after each addition, alternately add dry ingredients in fourths, milk in thirds, to creamed mixture. Finally, beat only until smooth (do not overbeat). Pour batter over fruit nut mixture and mix thoroughly.

Beat egg whites until rounded peaks are formed. Spread beaten egg whites over batter and fold together. Turn batter into pan and spread evenly to edges.

Bake at 275*F 1 hr. 30 min., or until cake tests done with cake tester. Cool and remove from pan as directed for butter-type cakes.