Honey Cake

Honey Cake

A Recipe from The Golden Jubilee Recipe Book (1959)

About the Recipe

Tonight (September 6, 2021) at sundown, is the start of Rosh Hashana, the Jewish holiday celebrating the new year. It’s one of my favorite holidays. It means time with family, getting a little bit of wine even when it wasn’t supposed to be allowed, and of course – delicious food. One of the traditional dishes to celebrate is honey cake, so of course I went looking for a good one!

This one is delicious! Light and fluffy, and just the right amount of sticky sweet for a sweet new year. It’s already bubbling and rising by the time the batter goes into the pan, which is exactly what one looks for in a great honey cake. It’s got a very traditional flavor to it, without all the density that sometimes comes along.

Two quick changes – throw this one in a 9×13 pan. Otherwise you’ll end up with batter everywhere! And I went a little bit lighter on the added sugar, maybe a 1/4 cup less. I find the balance is a bit better.

L’shana tovah! And happy 5782!

About the book

This book is the gift that keeps on giving. As it turns out, this little B’nai B’rith book has filtered down all over the New York metro area. A friend of mine found the noodle kugel recipe that I shared previously and noted that it was the same one she used in childhood. The dishes in it seem to be all of the regional favorites of Jewish New York, and I’m not even a little bit upset about it.

On a more personal note, one of the ladies who submitted a “Similar recipe” above is Rose Dubinsky. My paternal grandmother was a Dubinsky. Her family came over through Ellis Island and lived in New York for awhile before relocating to the Baltimore/DC area. I can’t help but wonder if an old family recipe has just come back around to find me this time around…

The Recipe!

Ingredients:

4 eggs
2 cups sugar
1 lb. honey
1 t baking soda
1 cup strong coffee
4 cups flour
2 t baking powder
Juice of 1/2 lemon
Juice of 1/2 orange
1/4 cup almonds

Directions:

Mix eggs and sugar together; add honey.

Dissolve soda with a little hot water and add.

Sift flour and baking powder; add alternately with coffee; add the juices; stir in almonds.

Line 8″ x 10″ (I used a 9×13 and barely had enough room) baking dish with foil; pour in batter and bake in 350*F oven one hour.

Potato Pancakes No. 2

Potato Pancakes No. 2

A Recipe from Tempting Kosher Dishes from the B. Manichewitz Co. (1930)

About the Recipe

It’s wintertime holiday season, which means it’s time for some latkes! And who better to give Becky and I a perfect latke recipe, than the Manichewitz Company? This is a basic, excellent recipe and hit the latke craving spot just right. Since it’s not Passover, we subbed in flour for the matzoh meal which worked just fine. We also splurged a little bit and fried it up in schmaltz, and I’m not going to lie – it’s divine!

Pro tip: To keep your oil / fat from going wonky and getting brown and burnt, stick a mini carrot or part of a full carrot in your pan. It sounds odd, but it really does keep everything tasting great.

For more recipes from my Weekend at Becky’s click here!

About the book

This book is cool for a number of reasons. We’ll start with the book itself. This is the third edition of the 1930 book and comes with one half in English, and the other half in Yiddish. We can imagine that at that time Yiddish may have still been spoken in the home. As the unifying language of the Jewish people, it was guaranteed that whether you were a recent immigrant or first generation American, you were able to enjoy all of the recipes. (Author’s Note: an earlier version of this blog incorrectly described the language as Hebrew.)

Now the history of this particular book. It belonged originally to Becky’s namesake – the original Rebecca, and her great-grandmother on her mother’s side. She was born in 1891 in Poland, and lived in Brooklyn according to her naturalization record, dated April 18th, 1939 on Ancestry. It’s just so cool that this book has made it 2 generations down the line.

About the glassware

It’s only fitting that a family book should have its recipe plated on a family plate. This plain, lovely white dish came from Becky’s Dassie (grandma), and was passed down to enjoy in her kitchen. We don’t know much about it, but it’s pretty and it does an outstanding job as a latke platter.

The Recipe!

Ingredients:

5 or 6 grated raw potatoes (about 3 cups)
1 grated onion
2 eggs
3/4 cup Manischewitz’s Matzo Meal
1 T salt
1/2 t pepper

Directions:

Drain off most of the liquid from the grated potatoes, then mix them with the other ingredients. Drop by tablespoonfuls into deep fat heated to 375*. Fry until golden brown. Makes 10-12 pancakes.

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Molly Goldberg’s Noodle Cheese Casserole

Molly Goldberg’s Noodle Cheese Casserole

A Recipe from The Golden Jubilee Recipe Book (1959)

About the Recipe

Growing up, my mother always brought the kugel to family gatherings. And it was always the same (delicious, let’s be real) kugel – noodles, eggs, cinnamon, sugar, pineapple. As I got older, I discovered that there were other kugels in the world, and that a Jewish family’s kugel is just like an Italian family’s red sauce – personal, treasured, and shared over and over again.

This kugel is light and fluffy, unlike its heavier cousins. Separating and whipping up the eggs results in a light soufflĂ© around the noodles. You’re left with this lovely, savory kugel with the snaps of sweetness from the raisins. A definite winner in the grand scheme of kugels. Molly Goldberg should be proud!

For more recipes from my Weekend at Becky’s click here!

About the book

This book came from my favorite cookbook shop in the East Village in Manhattan. When my husband and I bought a house out on Long Island and started to say “goodbye for now” to our East Village apartment, this was one of the places we stopped by. I asked the proprietor specifically for a vintage, Jewish book and pulled this one out of a stack of them.

The book celebrates the 50th anniversary of the B’nai B’rith. It’s a compilation of recipes from earlier fundraising books and is just delightful. It’s sectioned out into traditional Jewish holiday menus, treats, and even has a special section for Passover. I feel so lucky to have given it another Jewish home and can’t wait to dive into it again.

About the glassware

This is the second time I’ve co-opted Becky’s Spice of Life dish for a kugel. It belonged to her grandmother and has been lovingly passed down. She’s got the whole set and I can’t resist using it whenever I can. This dish is a little bit larger than the average square pan (it’s 9 3/4 x 9 3/4) which usually results in a little more crispy top to go around, and who can get mad about that?

The Recipe!

Ingredients:

1 T butter, creamed
1/2 cup sugar
1 tsp. salt
3/4 cup cottage cheese
1/4 cup sour cream
1/4 cup raisins
Grated rind of 1/2 lemon
Juice of 1/2 lemon
1/2 lb. of broad noodles, cooked and drained
4 eggs, separated

Directions:

Blend butter, sugar and salt together well. Add the cottage cheese, sour cream, raisins, lemon rind and juice. Blend. Add the noodles. Beat egg yolks until very thick and lemon-colored. Fold into cheese and noodle mixture. Beat egg whites stiff and fold into all. Put into buttered casserole. Put casserole into a pan of hot water, and bake in a moderate oven 350F about an hour. Should serve 6 generously.

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